These Stars Strangely Predicted Their Own Death
02nd August, 2021
These Stars Strangely Predicted Their Own Death
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Death is rather unpredictable; well, that’s what we believe for the most part. But it turns out, a few celebrities accurately prophesied their own deaths. Death is probably life's biggest mystery, one that people have committed their lives to solve (oh, the irony!). We know that death is surprising, and we never know when and how it will occur. But for some reason, these celebrities made spookily accurate predictions about their death. What's unsettling is that some even knew the cause of their demise and the day they would die. We will never know whether these were just eerie coincidences or if these famous people had precognition.
James Dean
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James Dean
James Dean loved motorsport as much as acting. He always wanted to carve out a career in motorsport, although it never came to pass. That didn’t stop him from auto racing, though, as he kept purchasing high-end cars, like the Triumph Tiger T110 and the Porsche 550 Spyder, for racing. Sadly, it was this passion that cost his life. Dean died in an unfortunate car accident at the age of 24.

He crashed his Porsche head-on into a Ford Custom Tudor coupe at the intersection of Highways 41 on US Route 46 on September 30, 1955, in California. Dean always knew highways were a dangerous affair, and in an interview, he cautioned people to go easy on them. He said, "People say racing is dangerous, but I’ll take my chances on the track any day than on a highway. Take it easy on the highway; the life you save may be mine."

Amy Winehouse
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Amy Winehouse
Amy Winehouse was found dead in her London home from alcohol poisoning just two months before her 28th birthday. The talented artist struggled with substance abuse, and despite knowing that, she was unwilling to proceed with treatment the way the doctors wanted. Even if that meant death. Hours before her unfortunate demise, Amy admitted to Dr. Christina that she was drinking again after a long period of abstinence.

She knew it could have detrimental effects on her body and went on to say, "I don't want to die." While she did die, it wasn’t the first time that the London-born singer-songwriter knew she didn’t have long. Her long-time friend Alex Foden confirmed that she was always aware she’d die young. He said, “Amy always told me she thought she'd become a member of the 27 Club. Amy knew her limits — I truly believe she knew this final binge might kill her."

Jimi Hendrix
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Jimi Hendrix
The Seattle-born artist, who was a legend in so many ways, sang about his impending death in "Ballad of Jimi." The lyrics went, "Many things he would try, for he knew soon he’d die. Now Jimi’s gone; he’s not alone. His memory still lives on; five years, this he said.” In 1969, a year before his death, he again made a chilling but eventually accurate prediction about his death. He was visiting Morocco at the time, and during his tarot card reading, the death card emerged.

For some unknown reason, Hendrix said to a friend, “I’m going to die before I’m 30.” Both predictions came true when Hendrix was found dead on September 18, 1970, in London, close to two months before his 28th birthday. The cause of death was reported as asphyxia after he aspirated on his own vomit. Barbiturate intoxication also contributed to his death, his toxicology concluded.

Jim Morrison
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Jim Morrison
Jim Morrison was an enigmatic artist who was, somehow, also good at predicting future events. He famously foresaw the rise of EDM back in 1969, when he said, “Some brilliant kid will come along and be popular. I can see a lone artist with a lot of tapes and electrical … like an extension of the Moog synthesiser — a keyboard with the complexity and richness of a whole orchestra, y’know? There’s somebody out there, working in a basement, just inventing a whole new musical form.”

That came true just like his prediction about his own death. The Doors frontman was once out with friends in Los Angeles, mourning the recent demise of Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix. While talking about their unexpected deaths at 27, Morrison left his friends speechless when he said, "You're drinking with number three. That's right, number three." He died nine months later from substance abuse.

Jeff Buckley
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Jeff Buckley
Jeff Buckley’s death, at the age of 30, feels wrong and heartbreaking even today. His career was just starting to gather steam, and he looked set to achieve worldwide fame. Unfortunately, he passed away too soon, in the year 1997. The California-born guitarist went for a swim in the Mississippi River when he was caught in the wake of a passing boat. He drowned, and his body was found five days later, on June 4.

His fans have since been treated to posthumous releases of his work, although Grace remains his own studio album. Interestingly, one of the songs in it, named “Dream Brother,” has a line that strangely provides an accurate description of how Buckley would die three years later. It goes, “Your eyes to the ground and the world spinning round forever / Asleep in the sand with the ocean washing over.” A pretty spooky prediction, isn’t it?

Buddy Holly
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Buddy Holly
Charles Hardin Holley, who was professionally known as Buddy Holly, is another among those rare personalities who first made a name for themselves and then went about predicting their own deaths. Holly’s premonition is distinctive, as he and his wife Maria had vaguely the same nightmare that eventually turned out to be true. Maria dreamt of a fireball descending to Earth in the middle of a field, followed by an explosion that caused a hole in the ground.

Holly, meanwhile, dreamt that he, his wife, and his brother were in a plane, and his brother persuaded him to leave Maria on top of a building. This left Holly distraught. Weeks later, the singer-songwriter went on a tour in the Midwest. Suddenly, the weather changed, forcing Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. Richardson to board a chartered plane to reach their next venue in Moorhead, Minnesota. Unfortunately, the plane crashed in a cornfield, killing everyone.

Abraham Lincoln
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Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, was a unique personality. He ended the Civil War, saving the country from itself, helped end slavery, and was possibly the only US President to dream about his own death. He did so through a vivid dream that turned out to be true. In the dream, Lincoln saw a catafalque in the East Wing of the White House.

When he walked toward it and asked a Union soldier, who was standing guard, about the identity of the dead person set down in it, the soldier replied, "The President." Less than two weeks after that, on the evening of April 14, 1865, Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, a famous actor and Confederate sympathizer, at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. His body, just like in the dream, was kept on a catafalque in the East Wing of the White House.

Michael Jackson
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Michael Jackson
Days before his death on June 25, 2009, Michael Jackson told his tour director Kenny Ortega something strange. MJ said, "God keeps talking to me.” He had also sent letters to his friend, Michael Jacobshagen, a portion of which read, “They are trying to murder me. I am scared about my life.” It is no secret that the King of Pop struggled with insomnia and anxiety disorder, which forced him to rely on prescription medications.

Rumour has it that one of these medications, called propofol, may have even contributed to his death. The autopsy confirmed that MJ died due to “acute propofol intoxication.” His personal doctor, Conrad Murray, had administered the fatal prescription dose. He was later convicted of involuntary manslaughter. However, there have been suggestions from MJ’s close ones that he was murdered. Regardless of how he died, Jackson’s prediction, days before his death, did turn out to be true.

John Lennon
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John Lennon
The legendary co-lead vocalist of the Beatles, for some reason, repeatedly talked about dying young. Freda Kelly, the band’s secretary from 1962 to 1972, recalled that John Lennon believed he would not make it to 40. In an interview with the Newsweek magazine in 1965, Lennon was even more descriptive about his death. When questioned how he thought he might die, Lennon said, "I’ll probably be popped off by some loony."

When Mal Evans, the band's former manager, was shot and murdered in January 1976, Lennon reiterated, "I’m next; I know it." And he was right. The legendary singer was shot five times by a disturbed man named Mark Chapman on December 8, 1980. Meanwhile, some fans also believe that “Borrowed Time,” which was part of what turned out to be Lennon’s last album, also referenced to the fact that the Beatles lead won’t have a long life.

Grigori Rasputin
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Grigori Rasputin
The life of Grigori Rasputin, eminently known as Russia’s “Mad Monk” and one of history’s most charismatic figures, is shrouded in mystery, and the fact that he not only predicted his own death but also foresaw the fall of the entire Romanov dynasty is well-known. In a letter addressed to the last emperor of Russia, Tsar Nicholas II, Rasputin wrote, “I feel that I shall leave life before January 1st... If it was your relations who have wrought my death, then none of your children will remain alive for more than two years.”

All of it came true, word for word, beginning with Rasputin’s murder by a group that included the Tsar Nicholas’ cousin and nephew-in-law in the morning of December 30, 1916. Less than two years later, Tsar Nicholas, his wife Alexandra, and their four children were also executed, thus ending the Romanov dynasty as Rasputin had accurately predicted.

Avicii
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Avicii
Tim Bergling, aka Avicii, was one of the most popular DJs of the last decade. He could mix western styles with EDM as if they were meant to be together. His remixes became the anthem for many youngsters. This made Avicii a wanted man, which unknowingly played a part in his death.

Frequent touring was taking a heavy toll on his mental and physical health; in the Netflix documentary Avicii: True Stories, the Swedish DJ went as far as to say that he was going to die if he continued touring. He said, “They have seen how ill I have felt by doing it, but I had a lot of push-backs when I wanted to stop doing gigs. I have said, like, I’m going to die. I have said it so many times.” Six months after the documentary was released, Avicii was found dead at the Muscat Hills Resort.

The Notorious B.I.G.
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The Notorious B.I.G.
Christopher Wallace, better known as the Notorious B.I.G., was one of the greatest rappers the East Coast ever saw. Unfortunately, fans couldn’t cherish his music for too long, as he was assassinated in a Los Angeles drive-by on March 9, 1997. It was an unfortunate event for us, but as far as Wallace was concerned, he seemed to have known it. On March 25, his double album Life After Death was released, and the cover looked like a prophecy.

In the cover, Wallace holds a cold stare while leaning against a hearse, whose license plate reads “B.I.G.” It seems spooky, almost as if Wallace would be traveling in one of these soon. His last song, “Suicidal Thoughts,” also alludes to his death — "I wonder if I died, would tears come to her eyes? I want to leave; I swear to God I feel like death is calling me."

Martin Luther King Jr.
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Martin Luther King Jr.
Dr. King stood for the right things, and that made him an easy enemy. According to a 1968 poll, as many as 75% of the population disapproved of Dr. King’s revolutionary ideas, which is shocking when you think about it today. Dr. King knew that himself, and maybe that is why, in his last speech titled “I’ve Been to the Mountain Top” on April 3, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee, he glimpsed at his forthcoming murder.

He said, “I would like to live a long life, but I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with you.” Unfortunately for America, the former Nobel Peace Prize winner was absolutely right. The morning after he gave the speech, Martin Luther King, Jr. was fatally shot when standing on the balcony of his second-story room at the Lorraine Motel.

William Thomas Stead
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William Thomas Stead
Close to three decades before his death, William Thomas Stead, an acclaimed British writer and forefather of investigative journalism, authored a piece called “The Sinking of a Modern Liner,” in which Stead talked about an ocean liner that leaves Liverpool on a journey to New York City. On the way, the ship collides, and that ends up killing thousands of passengers. He also spoke about the lack of lifeboats aboard the liner in the book, stating, “This is exactly what will take place if liners are sent to sea short of boats."

As you’d probably know, the Titanic left Southampton for the United States but sank in the Atlantic Ocean after colliding with an iceberg in the wee hours of April 15, 1912. Thousands of passengers died, as there weren’t enough lifeboats for everyone. Interestingly, Stead was aboard the ship at the same time and, therefore, met the same fate.

Ernest Hemingway
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Ernest Hemingway
Ernest Hemingway, one of the greatest writers of his century and a proud recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, developed an identity crisis because of his volatile childhood. He lived a harrowing life, which included brief spells of hospitalizations due to his bipolar disorder, severe depression, and skin cancer, among other life-threatening conditions he lived with. While he didn’t predict any of these conditions, Hemingway, who died by suicide in 1961, did foretell the manner in which he would die.

When his father, Clarence, who was suffering from heart disease, diabetes, and mental conditions, put a bullet to his head in December 1928, Ernest casually said, "I'll probably go the same way." He fulfilled the prophecy on July 2, 1961, as he shot himself in the head. For the Hemingway family, however, it was nothing new. Suicide had also claimed the lives of Ernest Hemingway’s brother, sister, and niece as well.

Kurt Cobain
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Kurt Cobain
From Lana Del Rey to Win Butler and the Weezer, Kurt Cobain inspired a generation of artists and bands to find their calling for music. His songs had a tremendous and lasting impact on the industry, making grunge gain popularity all over again. Sadly, though, Cobain didn’t have such an impact on his personal life as he struggled with multiple problems like undiagnosed chronic stomach conditions, depression, and alcoholism.

As the years rubbled on, these problems grew on him like old age until he decided he had enough and killed himself on April 5, 1994. He was 27 then, which is, eerily, precisely the age at which he had predicted he would die. When he was 14, Cobain told a classmate that he would achieve great success and go on to make a lot of money but then die at 27. All of those predictions turned out to be true.

John Denver
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John Denver
John Denver was an exceptional singer-songwriter who gave us legendary tracks like "Take Me Home, Country Roads'' and "Annie's Song.” In addition to being a successful musician, he was an actor and an amateur pilot. He especially loved flying, clocking over 2,700 hours of flying in his lifetime. Unfortunately, this hobby led to his untimely demise — he died at the age of 53 after his experimental Long-EZ kit plane crashed into Monterey Bay, near Pacific Grove, California, on October 12, 1997.

However, the fact that Denver may have foreshadowed his death was even more shocking than him crashing a plane. He penned “Leaving on a Jet Plane'' at the height of his career, and in it were the famous lyrics: "Cause I’m leavin’ on a jet plane, don’t know when I’ll be back again.” Nearly three decades after the song was released, Denver hopped onto his plane, and its crash claimed his life.

Mark Twain
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Mark Twain
Mark Twain, the Father of American Literature and the "greatest humorist the country ever produced,” will live on through the legacy he has left behind. However, the story of how he died is as popular as his legacy and adds further charm to his already-adored personality. The writer of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was born in November 1835, shortly after the appearance of Halley's Comet, which is a periodic comet that passes through Earth's vicinity about every 75 years. In 1909 Twain said, “I came in with Halley’s Comet.

It is coming again next year. The Almighty has said, no doubt, now there are these two unaccountable freaks; they came in together, they must go out together." Not many, if any, believed it, as Twain was always joking around. To everyone’s surprise, however, Twain died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910 — a day after the passing of Halley’s Comet.

Tupac Shakur
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Tupac Shakur
No matter how successful he got or how much money he made, Tupac was always chased by his violent past. The rapper, who grew up in New York, was affiliated with a street gang, signifying he made enemies and friends. For that reason, perhaps, Tupac always knew that he would be murdered at some point. He was so convinced of it that he rapped about how he’d die ("I been shot and murdered, can tell you how it happened word for word…") and also spoke about it in an interview back in 1994.

When asked where he saw himself in the next 15 years, Tupac replied, "Best case [scenario]? In a cemetery." Sadly that is what happened on September 7, 1996. Tupac was shot four times by a member of a Compton gang in a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada. He died six days after the incident at the age of 25.

Bob Marley
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Bob Marley
The Reggae legend was much more than a guy who sang well and played the guitar. His fans and others who closely studied his life will tell you that Bob Marley was something of a messiah: a man who only harbored good intentions despite having great power. People close to him even considered him a prophet, although not due to his groundbreaking ideas but because of his ability to accurately predict future events.

He made many strange but accurate predictions all the time, but the spookiest of them was when he made a revelation that he would die at 36. When one of his spooked-out friends questioned him why he was so certain he would die at that age, Marley stated that Jesus, too, lived until his 36th year. And weirdly enough, his prophecy came to pass, and Marley died of brain and lung cancer two months after he turned 36.